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Sample datasets

We have created several sample datasets to help you get started using TimescaleDB. These datasets vary in database size, number of time intervals, and number of values for the partition field.

Each gzip archive contains a single .sql file to create the necessary (hyper)tables within the database, and several .csv files that contain the data to be copied into those tables. These files presume the database you are importing them to has already been set up with the TimescaleDB extension.

Device ops: These datasets are designed to represent metrics (e.g. CPU, memory, network) collected from mobile devices. (Click on the name to download.)

  1. 1,000 devices recorded over 1,000 time intervals - 39MB
  2. 5,000 devices recorded over 2,000 time intervals - 390MB
  3. 3,000 devices recorded over 10,000 time intervals - 1.2GB

For more details and example usage, see In-depth: Device ops datasets.

Weather: These datasets are designed to represent temperature and humidity data from a variety of locations. (Click on the name to download.)

  1. 1,000 locations over 1,000 two-minute intervals - 8.1MB
  2. 1,000 locations over 15,000 two-minute intervals - 115MB
  3. 2,000 locations over 20,000 two-minute intervals - 305MB

For more details and example usage, see In-depth: Weather datasets.

Importing

Briefly, the import steps are:

  1. Setup a database with TimescaleDB.
  2. Unzip the archive.
  3. Import the .sql file to create the (hyper)tables via psql.
  4. Import the data from .csv files via psql.

Each dataset is named [dataset]_[size].tar.gz. For example, devices_small.tar.gz is dataset devices and size small. Each dataset contains one .sql file named [dataset].sql and a few CSV files named in the format [dataset]_[size]_[table].csv.

As an example, if you wanted to import the devices_small dataset above, it creates two tables (device_info and a hypertable named readings) from devices.sql. Therefore, there are two CSV files: devices_small_readings.csv and devices_small_device_info.csv. So, to import this dataset into a TimescaleDB database named devices_small:

# (1) unzip the archive
tar -xvzf devices_small.tar.gz

# (2) import the .sql file to the database
psql -U postgres -d devices_small < devices.sql

# (3) import data from .csv files to the database
psql -U postgres -d devices_small -c "\COPY readings FROM devices_small_readings.csv CSV"
psql -U postgres -d devices_small -c "\COPY device_info FROM devices_small_device_info.csv CSV"

The data is now ready for you to use.

tip
The standard COPY command in PostgreSQL is single threaded. So to speed up importing the larger sample datasets, we recommend using our parallel importer instead.
# To access your database (e.g., devices_small)
psql -U postgres -h localhost -d devices_small

In-depth: Device ops datasets

After importing one of these datasets (devices_small, devices_med, devices_big), you will find a plain PostgreSQL table called device_info and a hypertable called readings. The device_info table has (static) metadata about each device, such as the OS name and manufacturer. The readings hypertable tracks data sent from each device, e.g. CPU activity, memory levels, etc. Because hypertables are exposed as a single table, you can query them and join them with the metadata as you would normal SQL tables (see Example Queries below).

Schemas

Table "public.device_info"
Column       | Type | Modifiers
-------------+------+-----------
device_id    | text |
api_version  | text |
manufacturer | text |
model        | text |
os_name      | text |
Table "public.readings"
Column              |       Type       | Modifiers
--------------------+------------------+-----------
time                | bigint           |
device_id           | text             |
battery_level       | double precision |
battery_status      | text             |
battery_temperature | double precision |
bssid               | text             |
cpu_avg_1min        | double precision |
cpu_avg_5min        | double precision |
cpu_avg_15min       | double precision |
mem_free            | double precision |
mem_used            | double precision |
rssi                | double precision |
ssid                | text             |
Indexes:
  "readings_device_id_time_idx" btree (device_id, "time" DESC)
  "readings_time_idx" btree ("time" DESC)

Example queries

Note: Uses dataset devices_med

10 most recent battery temperature readings for charging devices

SELECT time, device_id, battery_temperature
FROM readings
WHERE battery_status = 'charging'
ORDER BY time DESC LIMIT 10;

time                   | device_id  | battery_temperature
-----------------------+------------+---------------------
2016-11-15 23:39:30-05 | demo004887 |                99.3
2016-11-15 23:39:30-05 | demo004882 |               100.8
2016-11-15 23:39:30-05 | demo004862 |                95.7
2016-11-15 23:39:30-05 | demo004844 |                95.5
2016-11-15 23:39:30-05 | demo004841 |                95.4
2016-11-15 23:39:30-05 | demo004804 |               101.6
2016-11-15 23:39:30-05 | demo004784 |               100.6
2016-11-15 23:39:30-05 | demo004760 |                99.1
2016-11-15 23:39:30-05 | demo004731 |                97.9
2016-11-15 23:39:30-05 | demo004729 |                99.6
(10 rows)

Busiest devices (1 min avg) whose battery level is below 33% and is not charging

SELECT time, readings.device_id, cpu_avg_1min,
battery_level, battery_status, device_info.model
FROM readings
JOIN device_info ON readings.device_id = device_info.device_id
WHERE battery_level < 33 AND battery_status = 'discharging'
ORDER BY cpu_avg_1min DESC, time DESC LIMIT 5;

time                   | device_id  | cpu_avg_1min | battery_level | battery_status |  model
-----------------------+------------+--------------+---------------+----------------+---------
2016-11-15 23:30:00-05 | demo003764 |        98.99 |            32 | discharging    | focus
2016-11-15 22:54:30-05 | demo001935 |        98.99 |            30 | discharging    | pinto
2016-11-15 19:10:30-05 | demo000695 |        98.99 |            23 | discharging    | focus
2016-11-15 16:46:00-05 | demo002784 |        98.99 |            18 | discharging    | pinto
2016-11-15 14:58:30-05 | demo004978 |        98.99 |            22 | discharging    | mustang
(5 rows)
SELECT date_trunc('hour', time) "hour",
min(battery_level) min_battery_level,
max(battery_level) max_battery_level
FROM readings r
WHERE r.device_id IN (
    SELECT DISTINCT device_id FROM device_info
    WHERE model = 'pinto' OR model = 'focus'
) GROUP BY "hour" ORDER BY "hour" ASC LIMIT 12;

hour                   | min_battery_level | max_battery_level
-----------------------+-------------------+-------------------
2016-11-15 07:00:00-05 |                17 |                99
2016-11-15 08:00:00-05 |                11 |                98
2016-11-15 09:00:00-05 |                 6 |                97
2016-11-15 10:00:00-05 |                 6 |                97
2016-11-15 11:00:00-05 |                 6 |                97
2016-11-15 12:00:00-05 |                 6 |                97
2016-11-15 13:00:00-05 |                 6 |                97
2016-11-15 14:00:00-05 |                 6 |                98
2016-11-15 15:00:00-05 |                 6 |               100
2016-11-15 16:00:00-05 |                 6 |               100
2016-11-15 17:00:00-05 |                 6 |               100
2016-11-15 18:00:00-05 |                 6 |               100
(12 rows)

In-depth: Weather datasets

After importing one of these datasets (weather_small, weather_med, weather_big), you will find a plain PostgreSQL table called locations and a hypertable called conditions. The locations table has metadata about each of the locations, such as its name and environmental type. The conditions hypertable tracks readings of temperature and humidity from those locations. Because hypertables are exposed as a single table, you can query them and join them with the metadata as you would normal SQL tables (see Example Queries below).

Schemas

Table "public.locations"
Column      | Type | Modifiers
------------+------+-----------
device_id   | text |
location    | text |
environment | text |
Table "public.conditions"
Column      |           Type           | Modifiers
------------+--------------------------+-----------
time        | timestamp with time zone | not null
device_id   | text                     |
temperature | double precision         |
humidity    | double precision         |
Indexes:
"conditions_device_id_time_idx" btree (device_id, "time" DESC)
"conditions_time_idx" btree ("time" DESC)

Example queries

Note: Uses dataset weather_med

Last 10 readings

SELECT * FROM conditions c ORDER BY time DESC LIMIT 10;

time                   |     device_id      |    temperature     |      humidity
-----------------------+--------------------+--------------------+--------------------
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000000 |  84.10000000000034 |  83.70000000000053
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000001 | 35.999999999999915 |  51.79999999999994
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000002 |  68.90000000000006 |  63.09999999999999
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000003 |  83.70000000000041 |  84.69999999999989
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000004 |  83.10000000000039 |  84.00000000000051
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000005 |  85.10000000000034 |  81.70000000000017
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000006 |  61.09999999999999 | 49.800000000000026
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000007 |   82.9000000000004 |  84.80000000000047
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000008 | 58.599999999999966 |               40.2
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000009 | 61.000000000000014 | 49.399999999999906
(10 rows)

Last 10 readings from 'outside' locations

SELECT time, c.device_id, location,
trunc(temperature, 2) temperature, trunc(humidity, 2) humidity
FROM conditions c
INNER JOIN locations l ON c.device_id = l.device_id
WHERE l.environment = 'outside'
ORDER BY time DESC LIMIT 10;

time                   |     device_id      |   location    | temperature | humidity
-----------------------+--------------------+---------------+-------------+----------
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000000 | field-000000  |       84.10 |    83.70
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000001 | arctic-000000 |       35.99 |    51.79
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000003 | swamp-000000  |       83.70 |    84.69
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000004 | field-000001  |       83.10 |    84.00
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000005 | swamp-000001  |       85.10 |    81.70
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000007 | field-000002  |       82.90 |    84.80
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000014 | field-000003  |       84.50 |    83.90
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000015 | swamp-000002  |       85.50 |    66.00
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000017 | arctic-000001 |       35.29 |    50.59
2016-12-06 02:58:00-05 | weather-pro-000019 | arctic-000002 |       36.09 |    48.80
(10 rows)

Hourly average, min, and max temperatures for "field" locations

SELECT date_trunc('hour', time) "hour",
trunc(avg(temperature), 2) avg_temp,
trunc(min(temperature), 2) min_temp,
trunc(max(temperature), 2) max_temp
FROM conditions c
WHERE c.device_id IN (
    SELECT device_id FROM locations
    WHERE location LIKE 'field-%'
) GROUP BY "hour" ORDER BY "hour" ASC LIMIT 24;

hour                   | avg_temp | min_temp | max_temp
-----------------------+----------+----------+----------
2016-11-15 07:00:00-05 |    73.80 |    68.00 |    79.09
2016-11-15 08:00:00-05 |    74.80 |    68.69 |    80.29
2016-11-15 09:00:00-05 |    75.75 |    69.39 |    81.19
2016-11-15 10:00:00-05 |    76.75 |    70.09 |    82.29
2016-11-15 11:00:00-05 |    77.77 |    70.79 |    83.39
2016-11-15 12:00:00-05 |    78.76 |    71.69 |    84.49
2016-11-15 13:00:00-05 |    79.73 |    72.69 |    85.29
2016-11-15 14:00:00-05 |    80.72 |    73.49 |    86.99
2016-11-15 15:00:00-05 |    81.73 |    74.29 |    88.39
2016-11-15 16:00:00-05 |    82.70 |    75.09 |    88.89
2016-11-15 17:00:00-05 |    83.70 |    76.19 |    89.99
2016-11-15 18:00:00-05 |    84.67 |    77.09 |    90.00
2016-11-15 19:00:00-05 |    85.64 |    78.19 |    90.00
2016-11-15 20:00:00-05 |    86.53 |    78.59 |    90.00
2016-11-15 21:00:00-05 |    86.40 |    78.49 |    90.00
2016-11-15 22:00:00-05 |    85.39 |    77.29 |    89.30
2016-11-15 23:00:00-05 |    84.40 |    76.19 |    88.70
2016-11-16 00:00:00-05 |    83.39 |    75.39 |    87.90
2016-11-16 01:00:00-05 |    82.40 |    74.39 |    87.10
2016-11-16 02:00:00-05 |    81.40 |    73.29 |    86.29
2016-11-16 03:00:00-05 |    80.38 |    71.89 |    85.40
2016-11-16 04:00:00-05 |    79.41 |    70.59 |    84.40
2016-11-16 05:00:00-05 |    78.39 |    69.49 |    83.60
2016-11-16 06:00:00-05 |    78.42 |    69.49 |    84.40
(24 rows)

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